Thu. Jun 13th, 2024


Key Takeaways

  • The NZXT Lift 2 Ergo is a no-frills gaming mouse with a 26,000 DPI sensor, 8,000Hz polling rate, and clicky optical switches.
  • The mouse’s lightweight design and no-drag cable provide a comfortable and smooth gaming experience.
  • While lacking RGB, the NZXT CAM software is user-friendly, offering customizable DPI profiles and macros.


The NZXT Lift 2 Ergo lightweight wired gaming mouse is designed for those who want a no-frills device that just works. The mouse delivers a good feel in the hand, a solid gaming experience, and decent software for customization. Though the lack of RGB is a little bit of a downside, the Lift 2 Ergo makes up for that in how well it handles every other area. For $50, this mouse is a solid choice for budget gaming setups.

NZXT Lift 2 Ergo Gaming Mouse

NZXT Lift 2 Ergo

The NZXT Lift 2 Ergo wired gaming mouse offers a no-frills experience. The 26,000 DPI sensor and 8,000Hz polling rate ensure that your swipes or clicks are never missed, no matter how fast you play. The no-drag paracord-wrapped cable offers little to no resistance even with fast movements, and the optical switches are clicky and feel great too.

Weight
61g

Switches
Optical

RGB Lighting
None

Programmable Buttons
4

Connectivity
Wired

DPI
26,000

Polling Rate
8,000Hz

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • No-drag cable really has no drag
  • Feels good in the hand
Cons

  • No RGB or indicator lights of any kind

NZXT Hit the Mark for a No-Frills Gaming Mouse

Front view of the Lift 2 Ergo mouse
Jerome Thomas / How-To Geek


The NZXT Lift 2 Ergo really comes in as a no-frills gaming mouse in every sense of the phrase. That’s all it’s for. It’s extremely lightweight at 61g, has just enough buttons to get by, and doesn’t even have RGB lighting.

The attached USB-A cable is wrapped in a low-drag paracord, and low-drag it is. I could tell most wired gaming mice I’ve used in the past were wired. But, with the Lift 2 Ergo, unless it got caught on something (which was always my own fault), it was as if the cable wasn’t there. The cable provides little to no resistance whatsoever, whether it’s going down behind my desk to plug into the back of my tower or up to the top on the front of my PC. One thing to note here is that the cable is solidly attached and not removable, which is a little bit of a letdown. But, baring the cable itself breaking for some reason, there’s no other reason I could think of for wanting to remove it.

Bottom view of the Lift 2 Ergo mouse
Jerome Thomas / How-To Geek


Then, continuing on with the no-frills aesthetic, there’s a notable lack of RGB lighting. Coming from NZXT, this isn’t a huge surprise, but, it’s still a surprise none-the-less. Even a no-frills mouse like the Logitech G203 still had some RGB effects, even if it was just centered around the logo. The lack of RGB is both a positive and a negative, however.

It’s nice in that there’s less customization to do, you don’t have to deal with flashing lights, and it keeps a very simple aesthetic. However, the downside to that is it’s hard to know when you change certain profiles on the mouse. Most gaming mice have on-board profiles for DPI (dots per linear inch) and such, and you can know which profile you’re on with the flash of color somewhere. Top, logo, underneath. Somewhere. Well, the Lift 2 Ergo has none of that. There’s zero LEDs on the mouse anywhere, meaning you’re left to either jump into NZXT CAM to see what setting you’re on, or just memorize what the DPI jumps are so you know where you land. This was a little frustrating for me, but something I was able to get past after using the mouse for a few days.


Coming in two flavors, the Lift 2 Symm and this Ergo model make up the series of NZXT Lift 2. The Ergo was sufficiently ergonomic too. It’s not a MX Master 3S, and it’s definitely not a Logitech Lift, but even during longer gaming or work sessions, the mouse was sufficiently ergonomic for my use cases. I never felt like my hand got tired when using it, and it fit quite well for me. Now, this is something that will vary for everyone, as all hands are different. But, I feel that the Lift 2 Ergo is designed in such a way that it’ll be comfortable for the majority of people out there.

A closer look at the Lift 2 Ergo scroll wheel
Jerome Thomas / How-To Geek


When it comes to gaming mice in the $50 or less category, the quality can sometimes be hit or miss. Fortunately, NZXT hit the mark here. The scroll wheel is nice and sturdy, with zero wobble left or right. The switches, though optical, are nice, clicky, and solid-feeling. But, while being clicky, they aren’t loud, which is a nice benefit as you won’t bother others in the room with obnoxious clicking as you game. And the sensor is, well, sensitive.

I get why companies use high-DPI sensors that go up to 26,000, and why they’ve increased the polling rate to 8,000Hz, but, for the average user, those things just don’t really matter. I use a mouse personally at 1,600 DPI and no higher, as any higher and it becomes unusable for me. The 8,000Hz polling is nice though, as that means no matter how fast I move the mouse or click the buttons, it’ll recognize it and register the inputs.

NZXT CAM Has Come a Long Way

NZXT Lift 2 Ergo mouse in front of box
Jerome Thomas / How-To Geek


I remember the original days of NZXT Cam when the first Kraken CPU coolers came out, and it was abysmal. The NZXT CAM software of today is a far cry from its predecessor, and I’m glad about it. However, the options included in CAM for the Lift 2 are just as no-frills as the mouse itself.

You can set five onboard DPI profiles, choose the polling rate, lift-off distance, remap the buttons, and build macros. The reason I say the options are no-frills is because, while there are several things to choose from there, you really only have a few overall options. Macros are great, but you only have a total of four buttons to map them to. Remapping keys? Still, there are only four options to choose from here. Lift-off height? Two options. Now, DPI and polling rate leave you with quite a few decisions to make, and that’s perfectly fine as it allows you to dial in just how much CPU usage you want to dedicate to the mouse and exactly what DPI you want it to work at.


Speaking of DPI, you can change it in increments of 50, no more, no less. But, you can stop every 50 starting at 100 DPI, all the way up to 26,000. Which, if you’ve never tried a mouse at 26,000 DPI, you should. It’s insane.

All the CAM options are nice and easy to navigate though. It’s all on one page, allowing you to make a quick change and get back to your favorite game.

Should You Buy the NZXT Lift 2 Mouse?

An angled view of the Lift 2 Ergo mouse next to a keyboard
Jerome Thomas / How-To Geek

If you’re looking for a no-frills, all-performance wired gaming mouse, then the NZXT Lift 2 Ergo lightweight wired gaming mouse gets a recommendation from me. While the lack of lighting is a downside in a sense, I really do enjoy the simplicity of the mouse. It just works, and it’s good at what it’s supposed to do. At $49.99, it’s even fairly affordable, all things considered.


NZXT Lift 2 Ergo Gaming Mouse

NZXT Lift 2 Ergo

The NZXT Lift 2 Ergo wired gaming mouse offers a no-frills experience. The 26,000 DPI sensor and 8,000Hz polling rate ensure that your swipes or clicks are never missed, no matter how fast you play. The no-drag paracord-wrapped cable offers little to no resistance even with fast movements, and the optical switches are clicky and feel great too.



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By John P.

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