Thu. Jun 13th, 2024


Personal trainers and nutritionists can sometimes feel like luxuries only celebrities can afford. However, personalized fitness training plans and nutrition recommendations are more accessible than you may think. In fact, Microsoft Copilot AI has a “Fitness Trainer” GPT—let’s try it out.



You probably know about Microsoft Copilot—formerly “Bing Chat”—as a standard AI chatbot, but it has several specialized GPTs as well. There’s “Designer” for images, “Vacation Planner,” “Cooking Assistant,” and “Fitness Trainer.” I was interested to see how good the Fitness Trainer GPT is as I know how expensive custom training can be.


Microsoft Copilot Fitness Trainer recipe.


Whether it’s running, swimming, or weight lifting, getting started on your own without someone giving you clear direction is tough. If you’re like me, there’s a good chance you’ve turned to a good ‘ol Google Search for help. There’s a wealth of great information available online, but it lacks the personal touch that a trainer can give.

That’s what excited me about Copilot’s Fitness Trainer GPT. In theory, it can be more personal than trying to find a training plan or recommendations online that fit my criteria. If I want something different or I don’t like a particular part of the plan, I can just ask Copilot to change it on the fly. That’s the idea, at least.

Find Exercises That Meet Your Needs

The first thing I wanted to try was just getting some exercise recommendations to work on a specific part of my body. One of my knees has been bothering me, so I asked for stretches I could try and mentioned the equipment I have available.

What are some stretches I can try for a sore knee? I have foam rollers and resistance bands


First, it suggested I do a “Heel and Calf Stretch,” “Quadriceps Stretch,” and “Hamstring Stretch.” I have been to a physical trainer for my knee, and these are three stretches I was told to do—good job, AI. But I wanted more, and it ignored that I said I had foam rollers and resistance bands. So, I got more specific.

What can I do with a foam roller and resistance bands to help a sore knee?

This time, it suggested “Quadricept Roll,” “IT Band Roll,” “Clamshells,” “Terminal Knee Extension,” and “Mini Squats with Band.” Again, these are all things that a human physical trainer told me to do. The next question I would ask a human is, “How often should I do this stuff?”

How often should I do these exercises?

Copilot recommended that I do the foam rolling and resistance band exercises two-three times per week and the stretches daily. That also checks out with what I was told in real life. Your results may vary, of course, but in this instance, Copilot hit the nail on the head.


Build a Half Marathon Training Plan

One of the most common types of training plans available online for purchase are for half marathons. For many runners, a half marathon is a sweet spot between a relatively simple 5K and a very challenging marathon. If you’ve never attempted a half marathon, a training plan is immensely helpful.

There are plenty of training plans for many experience levels available online, but the ones that offer the most customization tend to come at a cost. So, let’s see what the Copilot Fitness Trainer can do. I’m going to get real specific with my request.

I am running a half marathon in 6 weeks. I can already run 5 miles pretty easily. I would like to run 3 times per week. Can you create a training plan for me?

Copilot spit out a long bulleted list, which I put in the chart below for easy viewing.


Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Day 1: 5 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 1: 5 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 1: 5 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 1: 5 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 1: 5 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 1: 4 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 2: Rest or cross-training (like cycling or swimming)

Day 2: Rest or cross-training

Day 2: Rest or cross-training

Day 2: Rest or cross-training

Day 2: Rest or cross-training

Day 2: Rest or cross-training

Day 3: 3 miles at a slightly faster pace

Day 3: 4 miles with some interval training (1 min fast, 2 min slow)

Day 3: 4 miles at a slightly faster pace

Day 3: 5 miles with some hill training

Day 3: 5 miles at a slightly faster pace

Day 3: 2 miles at race pace

Day 4: Rest

Day 4: Rest

Day 4: Rest

Day 4: Rest

Day 4: Rest

Day 4: Rest

Day 5: 6 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 5: 7 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 5: 8 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 5: 9 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 5: 10 miles at a comfortable pace

Day 5: Rest

Day 6: Rest

Day 6: Rest

Day 6: Rest

Day 6: Rest

Day 6: Rest

Day 6: Light walk or rest

Day 7: Rest or light activity (like walking)

Day 7: Rest or light activity

Day 7: Rest or light activity

Day 7: Rest or light activity

Day 7: Rest or light activity

Day 7: Race Day!

That’s a pretty solid training plan that lines up with other training plans I’ve seen online. The beauty of it is I didn’t have to scour a bunch of websites or pay money for a plan specific to my needs. I just asked for it.

Custom Weight Lifting Routines

Ever walk into a gym and feel completely lost in a sea of machines? Sure, you could start lifting heavy stuff all willy-nilly, but getting some help can go a long way. Let’s see what Copilot can do.

I’d like to get stronger for swimming. Can you create a weightlifting routine for me?


Again, Copilot put its responses into a bulleted list, but here it is in a handy chart.

Day 1: Upper Body

Day 2: Core and Stability

Day 3: Lower Body and Explosiveness

  • Pull-ups: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Bench press: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Seated cable rows: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Dumbbell shoulder press: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Tricep dips: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Planks: 3 sets of 30-60 seconds
  • Russian twists: 3 sets of 15-20 reps per side
  • Medicine ball slams: 3 sets of 10-15 reps
  • Stability ball push-ups: 3 sets of 10-15 reps
  • Leg raises: 3 sets of 10-15 reps
  • Squats: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Deadlifts: 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Box jumps: 3 sets of 10-15 reps
  • Lunges: 3 sets of 10-15 reps per leg
  • Calf raises: 3 sets of 15-20 reps

That’s exactly what I was looking for. The routine focuses on muscles used most for swimming, and now I won’t feel lost at the gym.

Get Help With Training Nutrition

The last thing to try out is food recommendations. Nutrition can be an integral part of any training routine, and there’s tons of great information about it online. I was curious to see if I could get a more personal touch with Copilot.

What should I eat after swim training?

Copilot gave me these three suggestions:

  1. Chicken Wrap: Chicken is a great source of lean protein. Pair it with red peppers, lettuce, cucumbers, and light sour cream for extra vitamins.
  2. Fish and Quinoa: Quinoa is protein-rich and contains nutrients that benefit swimmers. Fish provides omega-3 fatty acids for brain health and inflammation repair.
  3. Greek Yogurt and Fruit: Greek yogurt is packed with protein and potassium. Add berries for a sweet treat that boosts metabolism.


Sounds yummy. Let’s try a different activity.

What should I eat the night before a half marathon?

First, Copilot gave me some general information about what types of foods are best to eat. I wanted more specific recommendations, so I asked.

Can you give me specific recipes?

Copilot responded with a full recipe that included ingredients and instructions for “Chicken Curry with Rice.” Nice!


I’m pretty impressed with Copilot’s Fitness Trainer GPT. For the most part, it seems to be giving accurate information. Sometimes, it needs a little nudge to get what you really want, but that can be true for humans, too. That’s all part of why it’s an interesting tool. Of course, make sure you don’t just blindly follow anything it tells you to do. Some quick fact-checking and common sense will go a long way.



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By John P.

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